Tag Archives: women leaders

“Real life Wintour whisperer” in @FastCompany -on @MBFashionWeek, @Wang_Vera, #fashion, motherhood/career balance

Amplify’d from www.fastcompany.com

Stephanie Winston Wolkoff Brings Fashion to New York’s Lincoln Center

Credentials: Remember how Emily Blunt flanked Meryl Streep’s Anna Wintour-inspired character in The Devil Wears Prada, whispering names to her at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute Gala? Wolkoff was a real-life Wintour whisperer. She worked for 11 years as Vogue‘s director of special events, handling logistics — and, yes, all those names — for those galas at the Met.

Stephanie Winston Wolkoff, Lincoln Center, Director

Photograph by Peter Hapak

EnlargeSophia Loren

Photograph by Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Big Idea: Create a fashion hub at New York’s Lincoln Center, which Stephanie Winston Wolkoff calls a “blank white canvas that hadn’t been filled.” “We need to incorporate fashion into every element and institution,” she says, “whether it be through designer-lecture series,

Big Idea: Create a fashion hub at New York’s Lincoln Center, which Stephanie Winston Wolkoff calls a “blank white canvas that hadn’t been filled.” “We need to incorporate fashion into every element and institution,” she says, “whether it be through designer-lecture series, photography exhibitions, or collaborative efforts between artists and designers.” Wolkoff is starting with Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, which this month relocates to Lincoln Center from Bryant Park. Much as Lincoln Center has tried to diversify the audience for performing arts, the fashion-week director plans to democratize the typically insider-only event, via programs for designer-loving everyday Janes, including a Vogue consumer fashion show for 1,000 non-industry people featuring clothes that are actually available in stores.

Gala as brainteaser: Organizing the Costume Institute ball “was like a chess game. I knew every detail about every person at every single seat. I worked with other editors to decide what guest was wearing what, so they wouldn’t come in the same dresses. I made sure exes weren’t seated with exes.”

BlackBerry or iPhone? BlackBerry. “Indispensable!”

The Supermom myth: Wolkoff says her experience as a working mother taught her “there’s no such thing as Supermom. I thought I could have the best of both worlds, except the guilt inside of me took over.”

Life lessons from Anna Wintour: Wolkoff says she learned two key things from the editrix and mom of two, whom she calls her career role model: “That you actually can have a balance between family and career. And to follow your instincts.”

Read more at www.fastcompany.com

 

More Double Standards For Women in Business

A recent report published by the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology concludes that female managers who are seen as unkind, insensitive and unaware of others’ feelings are judged as worse bosses because of it – yet men who exhibit the same qualities aren’t.

“It seems female managers may be expected to be sensitive to others’ emotions and to demonstrate this sensitivity by providing emotional support. Because of this, female managers’ job performance is judged on them being understanding, kind, supportive and sensitive,” says Kristen Byron, assistant professor of management in the Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University, who conducted the research. “In contrast, this is not the basis to evaluate the performance of male managers. It is far more important for male managers, and men, in general, to be seen as analytical, logical and good at reasoning than showing care and concern for others.”

As a female business owner and manager I find this very interesting and slightly frustrating. I see this in my own business – if women managers are not sensitive it’s definitely brought to my attention by the staff moreso than if a male manager or colleague is a bit hard-edged.

There have been a lot of articles and studies on the management style of women vs. mens and the entire “bitch” assumption for successful women in business. The truth of the matter is that we are different than men, we lead, we follow, we teach, we learn – differently. This doesn’t mean we are any better or worse at managing – we just use different tactics to get what we need. Unfortunately, we probably do waste too many cycles worrying about everyone’s emotions or thoughts. Caring less – perhaps embracing a little more of our selfish side – could make us more efficient.

But then again, what’s wrong with emotion? As the late, great Anita Roddick claimed, “I run my company according to feminine principles – principles of caring, making intuitive decisions, not getting hung up on hierarchy, having a sense of work as being part of your life, not separate from it; putting your labour where your love is, being responsible to the world in how you use your profits; recognising the bottom line should stay at the bottom.”

Amen!