Tag Archives: Health

Changes to Change Your Life

“Ordinary people seek entertainment. Extraordinary people seek education and learning.”

As I grow older, I’m constantly on the lookout for ways to improve my life. I get the “itch” to do something drastic and different. But maybe it’s about changing more of the little things rather than just one big thing.

This is undoubtedly one of the most inspiring posts I’ve read this year. I’m going to strive to follow the advice here, (although I already do a few of them). Check it out and let me know the changes you see if you take these on! I’ll be sure to share my experiences as well.

50 Ways Happier, Healthier, And More Successful People Live On Their Own Terms

#38 of #365LifeLessons: Life Isn’t Perfect, But @SteveTobak Says It Can Be Successful – And Happy

My last blog post over the weekend was a facetious response to a conversation happening on my Facebook page. The conversation centered around how open one should be on social media – should we treat it like a holiday card and pretend that everything is always good – only posting the highlights of life? Is it okay to admit when we’ve got troubles? Why do people Vaguebook? With the cross of business and personal relationships, the opinions vary.

I’ve been asked many times – especially in interviews about being a female entrepreneur – how I manage to be so open and honest with some aspects of my life while also running a business. I remember at a conference a few years ago, one woman said she really admired how I talked about having kids – as though admitting that fact would be hazardous to my career. She said it inspired her to open up to clients “a little” and admit she has children. (That issue is a whole other blog post topic.)

Like everyone else, I’m just trying to live a balanced life. I don’t have all the answers and a lot of times I need inspiration, too. I found this interesting list of Six Ways to Be Successful & Happy, including “Quit trying so hard to get somewhere; Build Real Relationships and Do One Thing at a Time” by Steve Tobak at Inc Magazine. I thought it was a fascinating list, one which fits into the theme of building both a successful work and personal life. Consider it today’s lesson.

What I’ve Learned, What I’m Learning – #365LifeLessons

Things that make you go hmmmm. Drink long and prosper…

I find it hard to believe that social interactions would be the reason but wow, that’s an interesting study. Click through for the full article, of course.

“That said, the new study provides the strongest evidence yet that moderate drinking is not only fun but good for you. So make mine a double.”

Amplify’d from www.time.com

Why Do Heavy Drinkers Outlive Nondrinkers?

One of the most contentious issues in the vast literature about alcohol consumption has been the consistent finding that those who don’t drink actually tend to die sooner than those who do. The standard Alcoholics Anonymous explanation for this finding is that many of those who show up as abstainers in such research are actually former hard-core drunks who had already incurred health problems associated with drinking.

But a new paper in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research suggests that — for reasons that aren’t entirely clear — abstaining from alcohol does actually tend to increase one’s risk of dying even when you exclude former drinkers. The most shocking part? Abstainers’ mortality rates are higher than those of heavy drinkers.
(See pictures of booze under a microscope.)

Moderate drinking, which is defined as one to three drinks per day, is associated with the lowest mortality rates in alcohol studies. Moderate alcohol use (especially when the beverage of choice is red wine) is thought to improve heart health, circulation and sociability, which can be important because people who are isolated don’t have as many family members and friends who can notice and help treat health problems.

social interactions are vital for maintaining mental and physical health.Read more at www.time.com
 

The downside of multitasking – it fuels forgetting. An important piece on Alzheimer’s by @USAToday #health

Alzheimer’s runs in the women in my family – so I took special interest in this piece. With a busy life that practically defines the “many reasons for memory lapses: aging, stress, lack of sleep, distraction, inattention …” I am going to take some of these tips (click through to read them) to heart.

Please click through at the bottom to read the entire article. With

Amplify’d from www.usatoday.com
Memory lapse or Alzheimer’s? Multi-tasking fuels forgetting
SAN DIEGO — Those twinges of forgetfulness that appear to be getting more pronounced may worry you. After all, the statistics are scary: Every 70 seconds, someone in the USA develops Alzheimer’s. But every lapse isn’t a signal that your memory is kaput.

Cheryl Edwards-Cannon, 57, says she relies on Post-it notes and spiral notebooks to help her remember, since she’s multitasking “the majority of the time.”

There are many reasons for memory lapses: aging, stress, lack of sleep, distraction, inattention and disease. There’s a lot coming at us, and sometimes we may feel like we’re on information overload.

“Distraction may be just a very important factor that goes hand-in-hand with multitasking,” says Suparna Rajaram, a psychology professor at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, N.Y.

Whether new information sticks is “very dependent” on how much you focus, she says.

“Even if you’re distracted when remembering, you may be all right, but if you’re distracted when learning, you pay for it,” she says.

Rajaram is among researchers presenting new findings on memory at the American Psychological Association‘s annual meeting, which opens today in San Diego. About 14,000 psychology professionals are expected to attend the four days of presentations.

“People are trying to multitask more than they used to, but they don’t have to keep as many things in memory as they used to, because they have electronic devices that do that,” says psychology professor Nelson Cowan of the University of Missouri-Columbia. “Overall, I’m not sure whether this is training our brains or letting them go lax.”

Rajaram adds that people vary in memory capacity; some are just more forgetful. “Forgetfulness is not just being poor at remembering; it also occurs because as we gain experience in life and get older, we have more to remember,” she says.

Read more at www.usatoday.com